Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Cochlear Implants—Med-El

Med-El Opus 2 Cochlear Implant Audio Processor (demo)

The Med-El Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor was made by Med-El GMBH of Innsbruck, Austria in 2008.

This cochlear implant audio processor worked with the implanted Sonata.

Note: this is a demo model put out by Med-El so potential cochlear implant users could see and handle it.

It consisted of three parts—the behind-the-ear microphone/audio processor, the transmitting coil and the "FineTuner" remote control.
 

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Back

 
Side view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the transmitting coil (left) and the BTE microphone/audio processor (right).

You can read the 56-page Med-El Opus 2 cochlear implant User's Manual here.

Read the 8-page Med-EL Opus 2 cochlear implant Instruction Overview here.

Read the 2-page Med-El Opus 2 Made Easy "Quick Start" instructions here.

Look at the 1-page Med-El  Opus 2 picture overview sheet here.

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Side view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the ear hook (right), the audio processor electronics module (horizontal top part) and the battery compartment (vertical part).

Note that the Med-EL Opus 2 has a telecoil (t-coil) built in that is oriented vertically.

The Opus 2 measured 2 5/16" x ⅝" x ⅜" (5.8 x 1.5 x 0.9 cm).

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the microphone port at the top of the ear hook (right).
 

 

 

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Rear view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant transmitting coil.

The transmitting coil measured 1¼" in diameter by ¼" thick  (3.2 x 0.6 cm).

The cable joining the coil to the audio processor was 3¼" long (8.2 cm).

 

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Front view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant transmitting coil.

This unit consisted of a coil of wire around the periphery of the unit with a magnet in the center. The magnet in the center of the coil was oriented such that it attracted the corresponding magnet in the the center of the Sonata cochlear implant, thus holding the transmitting coil in place on the outside of the head.
 

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Close-up view of the unplugged MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant transmitting coil showing the 3-pin plug.
 

 

 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant transmitting coil plug showing the numbers on the plug.

 

 

 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant "FineTuner" remote control.

Note that the upper row of light blue buttons are labeled "M" (microphone only), "MT" (microphone and t-coil together) and "T" (t-coil only).

The four dark blue buttons with 1, 2, 3 and 4 dots respectively allowed you to switch to any one of the 4 programs (maps) the Opus 2 had.

The remote measured 3⅜" x 2⅛" x ¼" (8.6 x 5.4 x 0.6 cm).

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Rear view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant "FineTuner" remote control showing the battery compartment door (lower center).

 

 

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Side view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant "FineTuner" remote control showing how thin it really was.

 

 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the triangular battery compartment door latch (left) in the latched position.

This latch also had another rather-surprising function. It was the on-off switch for the audio processor shown here in the "on" position.

 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant showing the battery compartment latch in the unlatched position so you could slide the battery compartment cover off to replace the battery. You pulled up the latch from the bottom.

This latch also doubled as the on-off switch for the audio processor shown here in the "off" position.
 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the battery compartment cover sliding off revealing the cream-colored battery.

 

 

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View of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the battery compartment cover completely pulled off revealing the rechargeable battery pack in the battery compartment.

 

 

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Close-up view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the empty battery compartment.

 

 

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Another view of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing the empty battery compartment and the rechargeable battery below it.

The battery was a DeCapo PowerPack.

The battery pack measured 1 5/16" x 7/16" x ¼" (3.3 x 1.2 x 0.6 cm).

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Close-up view of the battery compartment of the MedEl Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor showing how the battery (dummy demo battery) fit into the battery compartment.

Charles Johnson of Med-El donated this Opus 2 cochlear implant audio processor demo to the Museum. Thanks Charles and Med-El.


 

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