Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Auricles

Blodgett's Micro-Audiphone

Frank M. Blodgett of New York, NY, received a patent for the original Micro-Audiphones on January 5, 1886. He then revised his design and received the patent for his new design on July 6, 1886. I doubt if he produced any Micro-Audiphones using the original design.

The Micro-Audiphones were first mentioned in the Scientific American of January 30, 1886. They were advertised between 1886 and 1894

However, it appears they were not a success, As a result, the Micro-Audiphones were not produced very long , and the Micro-Audiphone Co. was dissolved in 1894. Record showing Micro-Audiphone Co. dissolved in 1894.

The Micro-Audiphones shown here are based on the revised patent.

The Micro-Audiphones were very light, weighing just 0.1 oz (3 g) each.

They measured 1 11/16" long x 1 7/16" wide x 1" in depth (4.3 x 3.7 x 2.6 cm).

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Original design of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphone, 1886.

Read Blodgett's revised patent (Jul 6, 1886) for the Micro-Audiphone.

Ad for Micro-Audiphone 1887.

Ad for Micro-Audiphone 1892 (see bottom left).

Ad or Micro-Audiphone 1894 (see bottom left).

 

 

Top view of the Micro-Audiphone showing the "clam shell" design of this auricle.

 


 

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Bottom (inside) view of the Micro-Audiphone showing the slanted baffle on the left side that trapped the sound and "forced" it into the ear tip.

 


 

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Top view of the Micro-Audiphone showing the shell (rear) and the ear mold (front). Note the numeral "3" stamped on the ear mold. Presumably there were at least 3 sizes of ear molds available.


The Micro-Audiphones were made of an early kind of plastic.

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Front view of the Micro-Audiphone showing the ear mold part glued to the shell. The ear mold was a stock design rather than custom made for each person's ear.


 

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View of a pair of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphones. Note there were left and right Audiphones as shown.

 


 

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Front view of the left Micro-Audiphone showing how it looked from the front when modeled on a dummy head.

 


 

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Rear view of the left Micro-Audiphone showing how it looked from behind when modeled on a dummy head.

 


 

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A pair of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphones in their carrying case.

 


 

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Outside view of the carrying case of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphones.

 


 

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Rear view of the carrying case of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphones showing the hinge arrangement.

 


 

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Top view of the carrying case of Blodgett's Micro-Audiphones showing the name.

 

 

 


 

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