Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Auricles

Super-Ear Type H with Headband/Ear Clip

The Super-Ear Type H was manufactured by the American Ear Phone Company of New York, NY in 1926.

It could be worn with a headband (shown in picture) or with an ear clip (shown later).

The Super-Ear was primarily sold via direct mail.

With the headband, it weighed just 1.2 oz. (34 g). It measured 1¾" (front to back) x 2 7/16" high x 1¼" (width of scoop) (4.4 x 6.3 x 3.1 cm).
 

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Front close-up view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the "scoop". In fact, these devices were sometimes referred to as ear scoops.

The scoop funneled the sound waves to the back of the scoop where there was a narrow opening at the end of the raised metal  sound chamber (middle) from which the sounds then proceeded to the ear tip (white bottom)

Note that the sound chamber of the Type H (on the floor of the scoop) was much thicker, with larger opening at the back end and had a more efficient shape than the sound chamber of the previous model (Type G), so it should have worked better.

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View of the headband of the Super-Ear Type H. This headband was for wearing a Super-Ear in just one ear.

With the Type H Super-Ear there was an optional binaural headband so you could wear a Super-Ear in both ears.

Wearing a single-sided Super-Ear was the equivalent of wearing just one hearing aid.
 

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Front view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the two clips (one at each side of the front corner of the sound chamber) into which the tips of the headband (shown above) or the ear clips slid which held the headband or ear clips tightly to the Super-Ear. To change them, you just pulled the headband tips out and inserted the tips of the ear clips in their place.

The ear clip assembly is shown directly below the Super-Ear scoop.
 

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Close-up view of the bottom of the Super-Ear Type H showing the ear clips in place.

The ear clip wires were flexible and could be bent to comfortably fit smaller or larger ears.
 

 

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Close-up view of the bottom of the Super-Ear Type H showing the manufacturer's name and model number.

At the top it reads, "Pat. U.S. 3-3-25" (March 3, 1925) and "Canada 3-31-25" (March 31, 1925).

In the middle it reads, "Apply to better ear". (This fixed the error in English grammar on the previous model, the Type G, which read "Apply to best ear".

Below that is "Trade Mark Super-Ear", "Amer. Earphone Co. New York" and the model, "Type H".

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According to the information on this glassine envelope that came with the Super-Ear Type H, there were three sizes of ear tips—short, medium and long.

 

 

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Close-up view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the shorter ear tip in place.

This was a change from the previous model (Type G) where the ear tip was glued in place so it was "one size fits all".

 

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Close-up view of the Super-Ear Type H showing ear tip removed.

The ear tip was held in place by friction.
 

 

 

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Close-up view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the longer ear tip in place.
 

 

 

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Close-up view of 2 of the 3 Super-Ear Type H ear tips. Note that the shorter one has a larger diameter hole than the longer one.
 

 

 

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Another close-up view of 2 of the 3 Super-Ear Type H ear tips. I can't tell whether the medium or long ear tip is missing.
 

 

 

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Front view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear, held in place with the headband. Note how the headband held the Super-Ear tight to the external ear.
 

The Super-Ear mimicked cupping your hand behind your ear so you could hear better.

 

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Side view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear, held in place with the headband.

 

 

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Rear view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear, tightly held in place with the headband.

 

 

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Front view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear held in place with ear clips. Note that the ear clips did not hold the Super-Ear as tightly to the external ear as did wearing the headband.

 

 

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Side view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear held in place with ear clips.
 

 

 

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Rear view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the dummy wearing it on the right ear, and also showing how the ear clips fastened around the pinna holding it in place.

Although the ear clips were designed to be bent to fit different sizes of ears, the Super-Ear with ear clips did not fit as tightly to the ear with the ear clips as it did when wearing a headband.

 

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View of the Super-Ear Type H in its original box.


 

 

 

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Close-up view of the Super-Ear Type H showing the instructions for use pasted on the inside of the box lid.

There was also a different insert packaged with some Super-Ear Type H models. Read the original instructions on how to use these Super-Ear auricles.
 

 

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Top view of the Super-Ear Type H box showing the  "Super-Ear" trademark and the manufacturer's name "American Earphone Co." and location "New York, U.S.A.".

Ads appearing in the late 1920's stated "Non-Electric, No Battery, No Cords, No Headband Necessary". Their advertising also stated, "Thousands now used by judges, teachers, merchants, etc."

Note on the center of the box lid are the three essential points—"non-electrical, no cord, no battery"—a jab at the new-fangled vacuum tube hearing aids that were just appearing around this time, as well as at the current carbon hearing aids—both of which needed costly batteries that soon wore out, and which had cords that got tangled and broke.

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View of the box the Super-Ear Type H came in.

The box measured 4¼" x 3¼" x 2⅛" (10.8 x 8.3 x 5.4 cm).


 

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View of the insert that came in the box with the Super-Ear Type H.

Note that they recommended you should use your better ear and not to expect instant results.

 

 


 

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